CONSERVATION

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Conservation​

 

Pringle Bay is situated in the heart of the Cape Floral Kingdom, surrounded by majestic mountains, and the waters of False Bay. Bordering a nature reserve and falling within the Kogelberg Biosphere Reserve, we have the privilege of experiencing nature in all its splendour, from the rarest of fynbos species found deep in the reserve to the band of francolin marauding through town on a daily basis.

 

The PRBA plays an important role in conservation in the Hangklip area and contributions to its conservation fund are used to help run various projects. These projects include the purchasing and management of a camera trap to assist Cape Leopard Trust in their research, providing and maintaining signage around the village and beach aimed at preserving our wildlife and environment, as well as contributing to the equipment of the Pringle Bay Hacking group. Community support is crucial in making these projects happen. DONATE NOW!

CAMERA TRAP

The trap is operated by the PBRA on behalf of the Cape Leopard Trust. It is used to monitor 'resident leopards' as well as other wildlife in the area. In late 2018 and early 2019, after the January 2019 fire, the camera trap was able to confirm a sighting of the resident female 'Rosy' as well as the male. 

Leopard Scotty
Leopard Scotty

Scotty the previous male leopard operating in the Kogelberg Biosphere

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Leopard Scotty
Leopard Scotty

Scotty photographed in 2016, taken by Rooiels leopard camera

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Female Leopard Rosy
Female Leopard Rosy

This was the first time that the Pringle Bay leopard camera trap was triggered in the presence of a leopard. This leopard is called Rosy

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Leopard Rosy
Leopard Rosy

Photo taken 22 December 2018 in the region of the Small Hangklip

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Leopard Diago
Leopard Diago

The latest leopard footage of Diago, the new alpha male operating in the Kogelberg Biosphere, who took over from Scotty

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Leopard Diago
Leopard Diago

Photo of Diago, taken 28 January 2019

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Leopard Cub
Leopard Cub

Leopard cub photographed along the R44 at night time

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Leopard Team
Leopard Team

Leopard team setting up camera trap

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Honey Badger
Honey Badger

Rare sighting of a honey badger photographed 29 September 2019

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Porcupines
Porcupines

Two porcupines foraging photographed 1 October 2019

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OYSTERCATCHER

The endangered Oystercatchers breed on our beach annually around December.  We have specially made signs to mark where their nests are, and we ask that people give them a wide berth in order to preserve their breeding sites.

Oystercatcher Breeding Site
Oystercatcher Breeding Site

Nesting of the Black Oystercatchers normally starts in November and breeding takes place up to April. Photo credit Chris Geldenhuys

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Oystercatcher Breeding Site
Oystercatcher Breeding Site

Nests are being marked with a signpost and droppers to keep the public at bay. Photo credit Chris Geldenhuys

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Oystercatcher Family
Oystercatcher Family

The moment the chicks are born, they are taken to the rocks so that they can learn how to search for food. Photo credit Jenny Parsons

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Oystercatcher Family
Oystercatcher Family

Normally two eggs, but it seldom happens that both chicks survive. Photo credit Jenny Parsons

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Oystercatcher Family
Oystercatcher Family

Most of the time the chicks are kept in amongst the safety of the rocks for as long as the tides allow. Photo credit Jenny Parsons

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Oystercatcher Family
Oystercatcher Family

At high tide, the chicks are being taken back to the safety of the dunes. Photo credit Jenny Parsons

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Click on these posters from BirdLife SA to learn more about them: