BEACH

Beach Rehabilitation Fund​​

 

The beach fund was established in order to re-establish and maintain the beach and dunes area. This project is a co-ordinated effort between a marine engineer, the municipality and ratepayers. This includes establishing and maintaining a barrier to ensure that the Pringle Bay beach does not lose all its sand. The project also includes ensuring that the natural vegetation takes over the dunes and stabilises them. The last phase which is required to complete the restoration of the dunes for which funding is still needed is the movement of the back dunes to the foredunes. This is critical to both restore the natural balance of the dunes as well as stop encroachment of the dunes into the residential area.

Beach and Dune Maintenance

Management Plan

The Beach and Dune Maintenance Management Plan (MMP) was approved by the authorities in 2016 and is to be completed in 5 phases ideally over 2 to 3 years. The key objective is to reinstate the natural beach and foredune volume of sand that forms the natural buffer against sea storms and especially to combat future sea level rise and climate related changes.

 

Beach sand has been gradually lost to the system due to the development of Pringle Bay town which effectively cut-off the sand supply to the beach from the historic dunefield. Of significance is that the position of the waterline of the typical summer beach moved landwards at a rate of almost 3 m per year totalling 130 m between 1938 and 1987, as determined through historic aerial photo analysis.

Start of Project
Start of Project

Start of project by digging trenches

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Dune Rehab
Dune Rehab

Planting of the obstacles to catch the sand

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Dune Rehab
Dune Rehab

Rows of obstacles to ensure a nice broad dune

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Dune Rehab
Dune Rehab

Sand accumulated behind the branches after one storm

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Dune Rehab
Dune Rehab

This is how the dune has developed after one winter season

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Dune Rehab
Dune Rehab

Close-up of the dune, currently 6m from sea level to the top of the dune

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BEACH FOOTPATHS

The public is again requested to help protect our sand dunes by adhering to the pathways and not creating new paths when visiting the beach. Please do not interfere with the natural growth on the dunes.

ANN ROAD FOOTPATH
Before
Before

4 Augustus 2015 The path closest to the lagoon, Ann Road path

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After
After

7 June 2019 The path near the lagoon has re-established well thanks to good design, maintenance and adherence by beach goers

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Before
Before

4 August 2015 The Ann Road footpath

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After
After

7 June 2019 The Ann Road footpath, this is the shortest path to the beach

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MAIN BEACH FOOTPATH
Before
Before

4 Augustus 2015 The middle section of the main beach parking path

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Before
Before

4 August 2015 Sea section of the main parking path

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After
After

7 June 2019 The footpath from the main parking to the beach, drastic transformation from only a few droppers in vast open sandveld

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BARBARA ROAD FOOTPATH
Before
Before

4 August 2015 Sea section of the Barbara path

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Before
Before

This is how the green section behind the new dune looked on 4 August 2015, just after the storm water pipe was opened up the first time

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After
After

7 June 2019 The grass is getting a chance to stabilise the sand. In the background is the storm water outlet

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After
After

7 June 2019 The wetland behind the dune

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SAVE OUR BEACH

Ratepayers and their family members are encouraged to join in, lend a helping hand and ensure that the picturesque Pringle Bay pocket beach is sustained for future generations to also enjoy.

WANT TO SAVE THE BEACH? Please contribute to the Beach Fund to help us do just that!